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THE LEGENDS OF TEXAS Volume II: Pirates’ Gold and Other Tales (Pelican Pouch)

There’s treasure buried beneath Texas soil or stowed in caves covered over by stones. It might be the mother lode that’s waiting to be uncovered or some Spanish pirate’s chest of jewels and doubloons. Nearby a ghostly figure walks the dunes, or is it just an illusion brought on by the approaching dust storm?

In this new mass market edition, J. Frank Dobie has collected accounts of some of the best known tales of booty hidden in Texas hill and dale as well as some eerie stories and the origins of Texas flowers, names, and streams. You will learn about “The Enchanted Rock in Llano County,” “Lafitte’s Treasure Vault,” and “The Holy Spring of Father Margil at Nacogdoches.” These lively stories reveal the love for adventure, independence, and mystery that has made Texas the state it is. And just as Dobie hoped, with these tales readers from all over can see the “richness of their own traditions.”

Dobie believed that worthwhile literature about this region had to be derived from an understanding of its life, lore, and history. Legends of Texas indirectly led to the founding of the Texas Folklore Society, the nation’s second oldest folklore organization.

There’s treasure buried beneath Texas soil or stowed in caves covered over by stones. It might be the mother lode that’s waiting to be uncovered or some Spanish pirate’s chest of jewels and doubloons. Nearby a ghostly figure walks the dunes, or is it just an illusion brought on by the approaching dust storm?

In this new mass market edition, J. Frank Dobie has collected accounts of some of the best known tales of booty hidden in Texas hill and dale as well as some eerie stories and the origins of Texas flowers, names, and streams. You will learn about “The Enchanted Rock in Llano County,” “Lafitte’s Treasure Vault,” and “The Holy Spring of Father Margil at Nacogdoches.” These lively stories reveal the love for adventure, independence, and mystery that has made Texas the state it is. And just as Dobie hoped, with these tales readers from all over can see the “richness of their own traditions.”

Dobie believed that worthwhile literature about this region had to be derived from an understanding of its life, lore, and history. Legends of Texas indirectly led to the founding of the Texas Folklore Society, the nation’s second oldest folklore organization.

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  1. Ethan Hoggatt says

    Coronado’s Children

  2. Ohioan says

    Tales of Lost Mines

  3. Anonymous says

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